Queensgate Car Park Closure

A message from Sirona Capital:The Queensgate car park will be closed from Tuesday 3 April to facilitate the car park’s multi-million-dollar refurbishment, as part of the Kings Square Fremantle renewal.

The carpark is expected to be closed for about five months.

We understand this will come as a surprise because we initially told you we did not plan to close Queensgate car park during refurbishment. We don’t like having to make this announcement and we’re sorry that it is going to inconvenience many people.

FAQS

WHY IS THE CARPARK BEING CLOSED?
It’s all about safety. We decided to close the carpark after receiving the results of extensive structural testing of the carpark’s concrete and steel-reinforcement by Probuild and Sirona’s specialist consultants. It was concluded that work to remediate and protect the structure was far more extensive than anyone had originally expected.

Full closure means that the refurbishment can be finished sooner, it will be safer for the public and construction workers, and will deliver a much better result.

While the carpark is still safe and fit for purpose, a staged refurbishment simply isn’t possible.

WHAT ABOUT THE FREMANTLE INTERNATIONAL STREET ARTS FESTIVAL?
We know how important the Fremantle International Street Arts Festival is to retailers and the local community. With more than 150,000 people expected in the vity centre over the Festival’s four days, we wanted to do our bit to help the Festival to be a success.

That’s why we have insisted the start of refurbishment is delayed until after the Festival.

WHAT WILL BE DONE TO THE CARPARK?
Refurbishing the 40-year-old carpark will involve removing all redundant and corroded steelwork and applying protective coatings to halt any further degradation and substantially increase the car park’s
operational life for decades to come.

We are providing new lighting, bigger lifts, better accessibility, modern equipment, increased security
and a better-looking building.

The Sirona and Probuild teams will be working at a cracking pace to have the car park ready well ahead of the Christmas 2018 shopping period.

WHAT ABOUT PERMIT HOLDERS?
Queensgate’s permanent parking customers will relocate to the Collie Street car park.

WHERE ELSE CAN I PARK IN FREO?
The City of Fremantle has a range of parking options available in the Fremantle city centre.

The soon-to-be-opened 155-bay Cappuccino Strip carpark on the corner of Parry Street and South Terrace will help provide alternate parking.

The Point Street carpark has this month come back under the City’s control and the top level is being reopened adding 105 bays. This is in addition to a temporary carpark recently opened at this location with around 50 bays.

Parking directional signage is also being refreshed to make it easier for motorists find a place to park in Freo.

Go to the City of Fremantle website’s parking section for more information on other places to park in Freo.

 

 

Last Meeting of the Council…

While the last of the Ashes at the WACA is generating much reflection, here in Freo it is the last of the council meetings in the current Kings Square that is having us reflect on the end of an era

Tonight the City of Fremantle will hold its last council meeting at the William Street administration building before it is demolished and redeveloped as part of the $270m Kings Square Renewal Project.

From January 2018, all council and committee meetings will be held at the North Fremantle Community Hall while the City’s administration, offices and library will temporarily relocate to the former Fremantle Dockers building at Fremantle Oval.

I’m sure the last meeting at the 50-year-old council chambers will bring back many memories. As a council we’ve had a lot of memorable moments here, like the huge crowd in the public gallery when we approved the Esplanade Youth Plaza, signing off on Kings Square and approving Amendment 49 to pave the way for a more vibrant inner city. But I’m also really excited by what lies ahead because our new building will be a great addition to the rejuvenation of the Fremantle CBD.

The City will remain at Fremantle Oval until the civic administration building is completed, which is expected to be late 2019.

For more information and FAQs about the relocation visit: www.fremantle.wa.gov.au/themove

 

Archaeological dig set to unearth Freo’s first church

An archaeological dig planned for Fremantle’s historic Kings Square early next year will shed new light into what life was like in Fremantle during the late 1800s.

The dig, taking place across four zones in Kings Square from 15-21 January 2018, will look for evidence of the 1840s-built predecessor to the current St John’s Church which used to stand in the centre of the square.

The archaeologists expect to unearth the foundations of the first church, which was demolished in 1882, as well as other historical material such as glass bottles, clay pipes; and fragments of ceramic bowls and plates from this period.

The City hopes to be able to showcase the findings as it upgrades public spaces as part of the Kings Square Renewal project, which began earlier this year.

“Kings Square has a lot of stories to tell and we’re really looking forward to seeing what will be uncovered, particularly given an earlier dig in June 1986 identified the foundations of the first church,” said Fremantle Mayor Brad Pettitt.

“As well as the church foundations, we hope to find artefacts in public spaces outside the former Myer building which were once the sites of buildings spanning the early-mid 20th century.

“We want to incorporate the findings into the upcoming Kings Square public space upgrades. To do this we’re looking at opportunities to include ground viewing areas to provide visitors to Kings Square with a real window into the past,” Mayor Pettitt said.

Archae-aus, a cultural heritage management consultancy based in North Fremantle, has been appointed by the City of Fremantle to undertake the investigations as part of the broader redevelopment of Kings Square.

Community invited to become archaeologists for a day

Archae-aus and the Museum of Moving Objects will be conducting public archaeology engagement programs and workshops in Kings Square alongside the excavations.

Archae-aus Executive Archaeologist Fiona Hook said the public will be invited to come and discover first-hand what it’s like to be an archaeologist.

“It’s a very exciting project and we want the whole community to share in the thrill of discovery,” said Ms Hook.

“Not only will the public be able to view the excavations as we uncover Fremantle’s history, but people of all ages can also participate in hands-on activities and events including lunchbox excavations, historical object drawing and sustainability workshops, as well as free on-site talks.”

For public safety and to protect the contents of the dig sites, areas of Kings Square will be fenced off during the archaeological investigations. (Map attached)

For more information and links to book workshops and activities through Archae-aus visit https://mysay.fremantle.wa.gov.au/kings-square-dig

Feedback sought on the Kings Square public spaces (and there’s cool new online interactive map)

This press release went out today:

The community is now able to have their say on how public spaces in central Fremantle will look and function as part of the upcoming renewal of Kings Square.

An online interactive map of the area is available on the City’s My Say Freo engagement portal, where people are able to navigate through the various zones to provide input on design and function until 4 December 2017.

Key aspects of the draft Kings Square Public Realm Concept Design include:

  • more shaded areas, with a 5% increase in tree canopy
  • an additional 600sqm of public gardens and grassed areas (a 3.4% increase)
  • a new outdoor children’s play space
  • a designated church yard and urban garden area
  • new paving and street furniture extending further out to the edges of the square
  • the retention of service vehicle access, universally accessible parking and vehicle drop-off zones
  • designated outdoor spaces for events
  • wider footpaths to encourage alfresco dining
  • integrated public artworks celebrating Fremantle’s Aboriginal and European heritage.

 

Fremantle Mayor Brad Pettitt said the priority was to re-establish Kings Square as the true civic and commercial heart of Fremantle.

“Fremantle’s Kings Square is WA’s only formal town square and has a long and proud history of adapting to the needs of the community,” Mayor Pettitt said. “The next phase is something to look forward to but it’s crucial we get it right.

“When we first consulted the community in 2012 the key themes that came through were for future planning to prioritise pedestrians, deliver high-quality landscaping and shade cover and bringing back activity to all areas within Kings Square.

“I believe the draft plan delivers on the principles the community has asked for, but over the next six weeks we’ll be asking people for ideas on what could be done to get an even better result,” Mayor Pettitt said.

Background

Enhancing public spaces in and around Kings Square is a key component of the once-in-a-generation Kings Square Renewal project, which also involves the redevelopment of the former Myer building and Queensgate buildings and the City of Fremantle’s civic building and library.

The draft Kings Square Public Realm Concept Design was developed using principles developed and endorsed by a community ‘citizens jury’ in 2012.  These principles include the prioritisation of pedestrian space by minimising vehicle movements and non-essential parking, better activating the edges of the square and respecting the historic character of Kings Square.

The draft design and interactive map is now available for public comment on the City’s My Say Freo online community engagement portal until Monday 4 December 2017.

Was Building the Fremantle Town Hall in 1887 a Waste of Ratepayers Money?

This is classic and just shows how in local government while some things change, many remain much the same …. The Kings Square team have dug up a letter to the editor of the West Australian from 1885!

In it a local resident questions spending £13,000 of ratepayer money to build the Fremantle Town Hall and argues it would be a waste of money and better spent on improving local roads.

The letter is a great example of how local issues of the past are really not much different to the local issues of today.

http://trove.nla.gov.au/newspaper/article/2998877

THE FREMANTLE TOWN HALL.
To the Editor of the West Australian.
SIR,-I will ask you a little space in
your paper to make a few remarks about
the proposed Town Hall which is going
to cost about £13,000, and I am sure that
such an amount of money to be expended
on a Hall is quite absurd considering the
present condition of our streets. In all
Fremantle you find but two good streets
namely High and Cliff streets, and the
idea of spending such an amount upon a
Hall when money is so much needed
for necessary works is preposterous.
Start first with the North Ward –
Beach and Skinner streets are in their
natural states; Quarry, Finnerty and Bay
streets are in a disgraceful state, and
James street only half done.
We go now to the West Ward, the
least and most important ; we find Leake,
Bannister and Colley streets without curb-
ing and needing a through repair though-
out and Packingham street flooded after
any rain.
Now we go on to the South Ward,
we find South, Lord, Gray, Russell,
Howard, Mary, Alma, and Attfield streets,
are now as they were fifty years ago, and
some of them worse on account of the
sand draft ; Essex, Norfolk, and Suffolk,
in a disgraceful condition, the only good
street in the ward being Arundel street –
that having no curbing – South Terrace
half done and the remaining portion all
sand ; Fitzgerald Terrace, above Suffolk
street, a sanddrift.
Now while these works are so urgently
required it is proposed to expend in
round numbers about £13,000, on a Town
Hall. Is it common sense? Look at it
from a financial point ; if the money be
expended on the streets as it certainly
should be it would bring in a large re-
venue, as all the property situated in the
sandy streets, would increase three fold in
value, and, further, the owners could
build, which they cannot do in the present
condition of things.
The Town Hail would bring in no-
thing but gratification to a few of the
town’s people; it would ruin all outside
property, and be a heavy tax on the
people. This matter is before the rate-
payers and a poll is demanded to settle
the question. Let the ratepayers look at
the streets mentioned, and ask them-
selves which is the most important, to
have a Town Hall or make the streets.
The one a tax and no profit, the other
a necessary work giving people a road to
their doors and employment to many.
Yours truly,
RATEPAYER.
Fix this textFremantle, 2Sth May, 1885.

Community to help design new Kings Square public spaces

Kings Square is about much more than just new buildings and the community will soon be able to have their say on how public spaces in Fremantle’s Kings Square will look and function after council this week adopted a draft concept design for the area.

Key aspects of the draft Kings Square Public Realm Concept Design include:

  • more shaded areas, with a 5% increase in tree canopy
  • an additional 600sqm of public gardens and grassed areas (a 3.4% increase)
  • a new outdoor children’s play space
  • a designated church yard and urban garden area
  • new paving and street furniture extending further out to the edges of the square
  • the retention of service vehicle access, universally accessible parking and vehicle drop-off zones
  • designated outdoor spaces for events
  • wider footpaths to encourage alfresco dining
  • integrated public artworks celebrating Fremantle’s Aboriginal and European heritage.

 

The priority is to re-establish Kings Square as the true civic and commercial heart of Fremantle.

Fremantle’s Kings Square is WA’s only formal town square and has a long and proud history of adapting to the needs of the community. The next phase is something to look forward to but it’s crucial we get it right.

When we first consulted the community in 2012 the key themes that came through were for future planning to prioritise pedestrians, deliver high-quality landscaping and shade cover and to bring back activity to all areas within Kings Square.

I believe the draft plan delivers on the principles the community has asked for, but we’ll soon be asking people for their ideas on the plan and what could be done to get an even better result

Background

Enhancing public spaces in and around Kings Square is a key component of the once-in-a-generation Kings Square Renewal project, which also involves the redevelopment of the former Myer building and Queensgate buildings and the City of Fremantle’s civic building and library.

The draft Kings Square Public Realm Concept Design was developed using principles developed and endorsed by a community ‘citizens jury’ in 2012. These principles include the prioritisation of pedestrian space by minimising vehicle movements and non-essential parking, better activating the edges of the square and respecting the historic character of Kings Square.

 

View the draft Kings Square Public Realm Concept Design

 

The draft design will be available for public comment shortly via the City’s My Say Freo online community engagement portal.

Freo tourist numbers set to double with Kings Square FOMO festival precinct

This is a BIG retail announcement for Freo. Fear Of Missing Out indeed!

Freo tourist numbers set to double with Kings Square FOMO festival precinct

https://thewest.com.au/business/commercial-property/freo-tourist-numbers-set-to-double-with-kings-square-fomo-festival-precinct-ng-b88598347z

The FOMO space will incorporate the redevelopment of the former Myer and Queensgate buildings and carpark.
The FOMO space will incorporate the redevelopment of the former Myer and Queensgate buildings and carpark.Picture: Supplied

Kings Square Fremantle will play host to a semi-permanent festival under a radical but carefully curated multimillion-dollar plan for a borderless retail, community and entertainment precinct.

FOMO, as the precinct has been christened, will reverse the effect of decades of neglect to allow Fremantle to reclaim its status as a thriving tourist destination, according to Sirona Capital managing director Matthew McNeilly, the developer of the $270 million office, retail, church and civic precinct.

“We threw out the retail rule book,” Mr McNeilly said.

“We saw a once-in-a-generation opportunity to harness the unique personality of Fremantle to create a retail environment where the journey will be as important as the destination.”

The flavour of FOMO, the 5783sqm retail space at the heart of Kings Square, will be devised in a series of workshops with the community, artists and musicians of Fremantle, highlighting and intensifying the best of Fremantle’s makers and artisans.

The Daily will be part of an art, architecture, culture and retail hub “unique to Fremantle”.
The Daily will be part of an art, architecture, culture and retail hub “unique to Fremantle”.Picture: Supplied

Its precincts include Street Alley, Tidal Land and Newman Court — a food space with slow food, good food, fast and fresh food which then morphs into spaces selling homewares, fashion and homemade goods.

Radical retail architect, HDR Rice Daubney principal Susanne Pini, said the double-storey Emporium (the former Myer building) would echo a “cool container” with an eclectic mix of organic and free flowing retail concepts.

For example, an area called The Daily, will offer local makers workspace, gallery, retail space around the base of the old carpark area and a window for passing pedestrians into how artisans bring their ideas to life.

City of Fremantle mayor Brad Pettitt said FOMO will be an art, architecture, culture and retail hub “unique to Fremantle”.

The project, to include two office campuses with 20,400sqm of A-grade office space, a revamped 800 bay carpark and outdoor retail, entertainment and eating spaces and a new $50 million civic precinct for the City of Fremantle, was “a unique opportunity to take a retail risk”, Mr McNeilly, said.

The office complex will house more than 1500 workers and Mr McNeilly said that in curating and intensifying the appealing elements of Fremantle, FOMO would almost double the number of tourists visiting Fremantle from 1.6 million to 3 million a year.